Shetland Trip – Day 8 – 3/x/16

After the previous days excitement I decided it would be worth the early start to see what the days net round produced. And I wasn’t disappointed! As head warden Dave Parnaby came entered the ringing room he announced that they had caught a 1st-year Common Rosefinch and that it was in one of the bags! After processing a few commoner migrants including a Redwing and a Garden Warbler, the finch was pulled from the bag, processed and shown outside. The relatively plain streaked brown plumage, bold black eye and typical finch bill allowed easy identification. The bird was shortly released and seen briefly when it landed in the plantation before being lost to view. One of the less inspiring additions to my British list but still interesting to see. Hopefully the next will be a spring male!

p1320462-ced

After breakfast, I headed out for my last few hours on the island before my 11 o’clock flight. I began by photographing the Great Skuas on the hillside behind the observatory.

p1320526-ced

p1320531-ced

p1320570-ced

p1320543-ced

I spent the remaining time in the south, where there appeared to have been a bit of a clear out. The highlights were only one Yellow-Browed Warbler, two Lapland Bunting and a Whinchat. The Short-Toed Lark showed very well again in the Cra – a nice conclusion to my time on the island!

p1320597-ced

I grabbed my things from the obs, hopped aboard the plane and enjoyed the short flight back to the mainland. After a bite to eat in Lerwick, I checked the bird news but was disappointed to see that things were very quiet!

I took the decision to head north towards Unst in the hope of finding something myself. However, as I headed towards the ferry terminal, a bleep from the pager informed me that a Swainson’s Thrush had just been found on the Fetlar! A change of tack was in order. I boarded the Fetlar ferry, but was becoming increasingly aware that I was racing against the light. It was already past 5 o’clock when I landed, meaning that I had only an hour of light left. When I arrived on site it appeared that everyone else had left, but one other local birder arrived and joined me. Inevitably, we couldn’t find the bird as dusk turned to dark but I decided it would be worth a go the following morning so hunkered down in the car for some shut-eye.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s